Skip to main content

About your Search

20130101
20130131
SHOW
( more )
STATION
MSNBCW 66
CSPAN 53
CNNW 39
MSNBC 38
KQED (PBS) 37
FBC 35
CSPAN2 25
KRCB (PBS) 25
LINKTV 22
WHUT (Howard University Television) 18
FOXNEWS 17
WETA 14
CURRENT 13
CNN 12
WRC (NBC) 10
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 549
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 549 (some duplicates have been removed)
: and for most of this hour conversation with the foreign minister of pakistan hina rabbani khar. >> i think pakistan today presents a country which is very clear notice head how it operate with its neighbors and that is to try and build on the trust and then build that trust enough to be able to build an environment in i we can take care of the disputes we have on the dialogue table rather than through military statements and through military actions. >> rose: the president's last press conference of his first term, and the foreign minister of pakistan when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following:. captioning sponsored by rose communications >> from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tonight we begin with news from the white house, president obama held the last press conference of his first term this morning. most focus was on the battle over the nation's debt limit. the president warned in his opening are remarks that the failure to raise the debt sealing would threaten the u.s. economy. >> so we got to pay our bills. and republicans in
applicable in pakistan. he had close relationships rhetorically with mullah omar and mullah omar reporter intervened on his behalf, again in 2006 to keep them in a leadership position in south waziristan. so does look like a pretty close operational relationship at least as far as it goes. for less than going to say just going forward is on the future of afghanistan, i could not agree more with what anand was thing about the money issue in afghanistan. i wrote a paper published here by new america called russian roulette, and i forget the subtitle, that runs through and as a comparison of the last days of the russian occupation in afghanistan in the late '80s with where we are today. frankly, i don't think from a sustainability of the afghan government standpoint we have done much better. and that's pretty depressing but i think that's the case. and we may have been worse. i think that a lot of ways you can make a strong argument that he was a more dynamic and creatively within hybrid car site. so the last thing though is where do we go going forward. and i think especially in the process
are important for the role of pakistan and many others. with that, let me turn to our three speakers, each of whom will speak for summer between six and ten minute roughly speaking and then we will open up to questions or dialogue with respect to the audience. we will start with jim, if you are ready, give you the floor. >> my response ability for afghanistan goes back to 2001 and is fair to say the time was present for creation of the current regime and i start by looking back and try to spot the things we did wrong at the time and it strikes me there were three fundamental errors two of which i perceive that the time and tried to do something about and one of which i failed to proceed entirely and did nothing about. one was the decision not to deploy any american or international peacekeepers in the country. we have a country with no police force and no army and we decided security would be an afghan responsibility after the fall of the taliban. i think that was a major mistake. the second was to allow the coalition we successfully built for the war and the peace conference disintegrate.
to pakistan's foreign minister. according to one international ranking, pakistan ranks as the 34th most corrupt country in the world. it is not surprising that people are protesting. >> corruption that is a challenge in pakistan, like in many other countries. we are doing whatever we can and we intend to do more. we think that is very different than the type of person you are talking about, the person that has absolutely no credentials. staying for the last six years or more in canada. they are challenging pakistan and the fears of 180 million people. challenging the system or we have paid the price to put that in place in pakistan. >> you are talking about the clerics that have called on people to protest. but we talked to you about relations between washington and islamabad. one of the sticking points have been u.s. drone strikes within pakistan. there have been seven droned strikes within the past few weeks. have you come to the conclusion that these drones strikes are useful for pakistan? >> absolutely not. the point has been made for the last many years that they would be productiv
to the to union, the former ambassador and the former secretary of pakistan to be hosted by the atlantic council here in washington, this is about 90 minutes. >> we are delighted to have you all. we are delighted to have our distinguished guests. it's pretty rare i think that you get three extraordinary ambassadors sitting next to one another each of whom has tremendous familiarity with the subject. on the council itself has been working on these issues for quite a number of years. this is actually the fourth anniversary of the salvation center. some of you may remember a few years ago the council did a very substantial report with respect to afghanistan. the then head of the council and the national security adviser was involved with some of the people in the audience involved frigate and we followed up on some of that work continuously over the last several years could get this is the latest installment if you will. i think that we all know that we are at an inflection point with respect to afghanistan to read a lot of the important decisions coming. president karzai is here to meet with presi
steve as well about your deep knowledge of afghanistan and pakistan and the other bordering states. >> this is one that has taken a back burner. we are not that far removed from the election. the election was about by and large nothing more than the economy and which side could do it better. as a result almost every other issue gets pushed to the side, but we have, you know -- there are realtime tables in place in afghanistan about what we have pledged to do, what we will do. you talk about chuck hagel. what chuck hagel's role in all of that, if et wants to be secretary of defense. it's a complicated issue, and it's more complicated politically, andrea, simply because the american public -- this happened in iraq. it's clearly happening in afghanistan. the american public has tired of our involvement in these conflicts. this is not something new. this is something that has been long and coming. if you look at the history in polling at least of when that happens, public opinion almost never sort of sways back up to all of a sudden be supportive and think this was a battle worth fight
. affiliated movements have taken us beyond the core leadership in afghanistan and pakistan, including the middle east, and east africa, central asia, and southeast asia. although each group is unique, all aspire to advance al qaeda's agenda by stabilizing the companies in which they operate and attacking the u.s. and plotting to strike it u.s. homeland. in south asia, al qaeda continues to pose a threat from its base of operation in pakistan's tribal areas. in order to use that to carry a attacks against a homeland as well as our interests and those of our allies and partners in pakistan, afghanistan, india, and europe. the united states faces to counter terrorism charges -- a direct threat posed by al qaeda in the arabian peninsula and the individuals and charities that flow from the region to al qaeda and its affiliates from world. on this point particularly, i want to emphasize severing the pipeline is a major part of what we're doing in its administration. al qaeda has shifted its activities to the relative safe haven of northern mali where it is training fighters and other allied
, thank you. >> brown: still to come on the "newshour": bombings in pakistan claim more than 100 lives; the new ability to pay mortgage lending rules; political uncertainty in venezuela and hollywood's take on the hunt for osama bin laden. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: vice president biden will send his recommendations to curb gun violence to president obama by tuesday. the vice president held another round of meetings on the topic in washington today. this time, including sporting groups as well as the powerful national rifle association and others. mr. biden said a consensus is emerging for tightening background checks and banning high-capacity ammunition magazines. >> there's got to be some common ground here to not solve every problem but diminish the probability that what we've seen in these mass shootings will occur and diminish the probability that our children are at risk in their schools. >> sreenivasan: late today, the n.r.a. issued a statement saying it was disappointed that the discussions focused mainly on what it called an
. and with respect to pakistan's and safe havens there, afghanistan and the united states and pakistan all have an interest in reducing the threat of extremism in some of these border regions between afghanistan and pakistan. and that's going to require more than simply military actions. that's really going to require political and diplomatic work between afghanistan and pakistan and the united states, obviously, will have an interest in facilitating and participating in cooperation between the two sovereign countries. but as president karzai i think has indicated, it's very hard to imagine a stability and peace in the region if pakistan and afghanistan don't come to some basic agreement and understanding about the threat of extremism to both countries and both governments. and both capitals. and i think you are starting to see a greater awareness of that on the part of the pakistani government. [ speaking foreign language ] >> translator: the question that you have made about -- we talked about this issue of -- in detail today. about the prisoners, about the detention centers. all of these wil
pakistan and india were at a nadir. coins and with 9/11 and the subsequent bond process, a pakistani base -- terrorist group had conducted a large- scale terrorist attack on the indian parliament. the countries were close to war. very close to war. the idea that they would collaborate in some joint venture in afghanistan was more difficult to conceive then that might be now. relations have to some degree improved. i do not think that india and pakistan between them would be able to substitute for the kind of assistance -- [indiscernible] for some time to come. to the extent the country's -- countries could agree on some form of joint collaboration, i would not oppose it. but neither would i look to it to shoulder much of the load in the short to medium term. >> from rote. -- front row. >> i write the mitchell reports and also councilmember. fassel -- i wanted to ask the ambassador about his observations about cost and risk. and to do that in the context of american domestic political setting, just to say that 2014 is not just another year. it is midterms. i wonder if there is a way, if yo
conducted by our c.i.a. principally in pakistan, afghanistan and somalia that will be our focus in a few moments. filmmaker and activist robert greenwald is back from pakistan where he tried determine if strikes which washington says are targeted on terrorists are making the u.s. any safer or rather creating a new generation of anti--american militants. now according to pakistani foreign minister, hina rabbani khar, things are making it worse. >> you're creating a thousand more people who will go in the ranks of al-qaeda and the taliban because they feel that when civilians die and illegal activity happens in another territory, it is a hostile one and it is something which has reaction. >> john: we'll have more on drone warfare in a moment. first for the latest on the algerian hostage crisis, we're joined by carlo munoz staff writer, following the story. thank you for following the story tonight. >> thank you for having me. >> john: what is the latest? they say the assault is over but apparently some prisoners are still, in fact, being held. >> that's what -- sort of where the situation
people were injured. the attack follows another strike in pakistan that killed up to 18 people on sunday. speaking reuters, the former commander of u.s. troops in afghanistan, retired general stanley mcchrystal, issued his strongest criticism to date of the drone attacks saying -- meanwhile, a former adviser to obama and security issues has forcefully come out against drone warfare saying it is encouraging arms proliferation worldwide while causing unknown civilian casualties. writing in this month's issue of international affairs, michael boyle, an advisor on the obama campaign's counter-terrorism expert group in 2007, 2008, writes -- president obama has formally unveiled his second term nominations for two key cabinet posts, a former republican senator chuck hagel for defense secretary and counterterrorism advisor john brennan to the helm the cia. they appeared with obama on monday at the white house. >> am also grateful for opportunity to help continue to strengthen our country and our alliances. in advance global freedom, decency, humanity. as we help build a better world for all man
's influential board and has served as a senior advisor as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasr. [cheers and applause] now, when you think of provocative conversation on the big foreign policy challenge of the day you have to think about our next debater. his program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide but he's anything but a talking head on tv. he writes a column for "the washington post" and is the edit or "time" magazine. please welcome back to the munk debate stage journalist fareed zakaria. [cheers and applause] now we're moments from getting our debate under way but before we hear opening statements, once again, i need this audience assist answer to make sure our debaters stay on time in terms of their opening and closing remark and we move forward as a debate together. so you will see this countdown clock, this clock appear. when it reaches zero applaud. this will let our debaters know that their time is over for their opening and closing statements. before we kick off the debate let's see how the 3,000 people gathered today voted
as a result of what's in the bill and what's not. >> brown: then, new killings in pakistan, we look at the uptick in violence against aid workers and women teachers with "washington post" foreign affairs reporter pam constable. >> woodruff: paul solman takes us inside a company that turns a profit by employing an unusual workforce. >> a massachusetts manufacturing firm founded in 1932 where the median age is 74 and rosa finnegan over there, is 100. >> brown: and ray suarez talks with journalist and author claudia kolker about what she calls "the immigrant advantage." >> i began to ask foreign-born people what i call the question: what's the smartest thing that people did in your home country that you want to hang on to while you're here and the rest of us ought to copy? >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from view
and significantly discordant situation in both afghanistan and across the border in pakistan. so i think you probably are going to see an unraveling gradually. i think there's only one afghan brigade that is capable of acting independently. these forces need air support intelligence, all of the kind of logistics and other support that is necessary to be effective. fighting forces, they're not going to have that, and so i am much less an optimist about this eventual outcome. but when you look at the middle east, look at what happened at iraq, look at what happened in syria, the united states no longer leading from behind waiting from behind, and then you look at the decisions concerning afghanistan, you can understand why people throughout the region believe the united states is withdrawing and that is not good for the region. >> schieffer: let me ask you this senator. we went to afghanistan in the beginning because we wanted them to deny al-qaeda a safe haven the terrorists who caused 9/11 and i think to some extent we probably have done that. but as long as they have a safe haven in pakist
. but for pakistan. it's the northern part of pakistan. waziristan, which is where the new homeland is of terrorist is who would attack the american homeland. i think what the objective would be is to have a small number of bases, small number of soldiers from which you could direct the trone attacks or special forces. remember, in the raid to kill bin laden, launching area was from afghanistan. and if we hadn't had afghanistan as the base from which we could launch, we'd have to do it by aircraft carrier or other means. it seems we should be infinitely more difficult. that is a strategic objective today. whether obama will be able to negotiate it, i don't know. but he did not succeed negotiating something similar in iraq. >> bret: the taliban is a big question about what happens after 2014. a lot of talk that we have had around this table over the years, 11 of them, has been about the taliban has a tempt calendar than we do. they operate in decades and centuries, while the u.s. has a different calendar here locally. today, karzai said there is a new effort underway to recognize tal taliban. >> we
": the targeting of pakistan aid workers; the value of seniors in the workforce and the "immigrant advantage." but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: wall street started the year with a bang, as the fiscal cliff deal put an end to fears of sweeping tax hikes and spending cuts. the dow jones industrial average surged 308 points to close at 13,412-- its biggest gain in a year. the nasdaq rose more than 92 points to close at 3,112. the civil war in syria yielded grim new numbers today. the u.n. human rights office reported the number of dead has risen sharply over previous figures. we have a report narrated by alex thomson of "independent television news." some of the images may be disturbing. >> truly shocking. the words of the u.n. officials. syrians need no persuading of that. today, at least another 30 or so added to the death list. somebody fired into the petrol station. they'd have none here for four days. news was spreading fast that respliefs happening and the place was crowded. vulnerable human bodies... metal, concrete, fire, and high explosive.
our government carries out these kinds of attacks is of course in pakistan. in 2010 we saw what the obama administration was going to be like on this score. there was a u.s. drone strike in pakistan roughly every three days in 2010. 9 new america foundation tracks these things and their record shows it was an unprecedented spike in terms of how frequently we were killing people in pakistan using this particular method of killing people even though pakistan is supposedly not a war zone for us, at least not more than anywhere else in the world. interestingly, though, in 2013 it dropped off. in 2011 we launched from dropping drone strikes in pakistan roughly every three days to launching them on average every five days. then in 2012 it dropped off even further. we were launching a drone strike in pakistan about every seven or eight days as of 2012. well, how is this year shaping up? it is january 10th. so so far there have only been ten days in 2013. of those ten days in 2013 so far we have launched a drone strike in pakistan on seven out of those ten days. now, maybe that is an ab
think they should be deploying drones? >> we have used drones against al qaeda in pakistan, afghanistan, and other places in the world. i think it is incumbent on us in the senate to make sure we have a framework for when and how we're going to approve the use of drones. i do think they are an important tool in our toolkit to fight back against islamic extremists and to take action against folks who have demonstrated to be a real threat to the united states and our regional allies. >> thank you very much for joining us from capitol hill tonight. >> thank you. >> in other news now, senior officials say that leon panetta, the defense secretary, decided to lift a ban about women in combat. it will make available hundreds of thousands of jobs. women are part of the active military personnel in america. and a suicide bombing at a mosque at the capital of baghdad. explosives inside the mosque south of kirkuk. a funeral was taking place at the time of the attack. russia says it is not planning large-scale evacuation of its citizens from syria despite the crisis there. many were flown back to m
government calls it an execution. a series of bomb blasts in pakistan claimed the lives of more than 100 people, many more injured. the nominations are out with lincoln leading the oscar pack. silver lining playbook has racked up an accomplishment not seen in 30 years. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. three kurdish women have been shot dead in paris in what police described as execution- style killings. one is being identified as the co-founder of the kurdish independent group that has been in an armed struggle with the kurdish government since the 1980's. >> by the time the bodies were removed this morning, riot police were forming a cordon around the murder scene. among them, the yellow hot militant groups. the women were found in a locked room of the information center. they had been shot in the head. the interior minister promised a thorough investigation. they were executed, he said, an extremely grave matter. three women were turkish born activists, the key figure was a co-founder of the group in the 1970's. another was the represent
, or instead, a different kind of mission? and pakistan in particular, the safe havens that are in pakistan, what kind of policy will you have? thank you. >> the mission will be fundamentally different. just to repeat, our main reason , should we have troops in afghanistan post-2014, at the invitation of the afghan government, will be to make sure that we are training, assisting, and advising afghan security forces who have taken the lead and are responsible for security throughout afghanistan and and interest the united states has, the reason we went into first place, is to make sure that al qaeda and its affiliates cannot launch an attack against the united states or other countries from afghanistan. we believe we can achieve that mission in a way that is very different from the very active presence that we have had in afghanistan over the last 11 years. president karzai has emphasized the strains that u.s. troop presence is in afghan villages, for example, has created. that will not be a strain if there is a follow-up operation because that will not be our responsibility. that will be th
of bombings in pakistan. eight people died in the initial attack at an explosion at a bill lard hall in pakistan. >> the united states is in the final chapter of the struggle to ensure afghanistan can govern and protect itself. that is defense secretary panetta's message. both men agree that the more than decade-long war has been costly. >> we have sacrificed together. that has created a bond that will not be broken in the future. >> u.s. troops are expected to leave afghanistan by the end of next year. today's meeting comes one day before karzai meeting with president obama at the white house. >> metro is looking at its security, specifically on buses. in the wake of a shooting incident last december that left a young mother dead and her daughter wounded. brown was shot to death while she was boarding a bus. her 23-month-old daughter was shot in the face but survived. authorities say the child's father later killed himself. police say that they caught the man who stole two police cruisers last month. they are both charged with grand larcenyny. the c
army is accusing pakistan of breaking the terms of the cease-fire in the disputed region of kashmir. the pakistani army claims one of its soldiers was killed in a cross border raids by the indian army. india said pakistan fired across the border for this. >> it is evident the pakistani army continues to violate the cease-fire agreement. maybe to facilitate infiltration attempts. the attempts of the infiltrators will not succeed. >> security issues aside, pakistan has to worry about widespread poverty. the un says more than half the population barely has enough to eat, and the energy shortage is making things worse. >> he used to be able to provide for his family. not anymore. a shortage of natural gas has taken his jobs. >>, as opposed to feed my kids? if it goes on like this, i would have no choice. >> the machinery in factories now stand idle. production lines are empty for thousands of workers out of the job. the energy crisis has paralyzed production in more than 500 factories. the government says it has to meet the demand from household users, but the result is an increase in u
from across the region, including pakistan. we welcome recent steps that have been taken in at that regard and we'll look for more tangible steps because a stable and secure afghanistan is in the interest not only of the afghan people and the united states, but the entire region. and finally, we reaffirm the strategic partnership we signed last year in kabul, the partnership between two sovereign nations, deepening ties of trade and commerce, development of education, opportunities for all afghans, men and women, boys and girls. this sends a clear message to afghans and to the region, as afghans stand up they will not stand alone. the united states and the world stands with them. now, let me close by saying that this continues to be a very difficult mission. our forces continue to serve and make tremendous sacrifices every day. the afghan people make significant sacrifices every day. afghan forces still need to grow strong. we remain vigilant against insider attacks. lasting peace and security will require governments and development that delivers for the afghan people an
-- afghanistan, pakistan, yemen and somalia. it's estimated that the cia and the united states military have undertaken more than three hundred drone strikes and killed about 2500 people. it's clear we have yet to understand the full impact of the country's drone war. one former obama security adviser calls the use of drone counterproductive. use of drones counterproductive, that is. and retired general stanley mcchrystal who championed use of drones in afghanistan is now advising caution. he says what scares me about the drone strikes is how they are perceived around the world. the resentment created by the use of american unmanned strikes is much greater than the average american anticipates and appreciates. they are hated on a visceral level, even by people who have never seen one or seen the everythings of one. yet earlier this week, the president nominated a man widely viewed as the administration's drone warrior to head the cia. obama counterterrorism adviser john brennan has made the legal case for targeted killings. some are now expressing concern over brennan in charge of the cia. a
personally intervened to resolve a diplomatic crises and difficult places from pakistan and afghanistan to egypt and sudan. and i really look forward to working with you on some of the challenging issues as it faces the country in the world but we start back to something and number of senators have referred to in your opening statement which you said. i just want to say i've been deeply encouraged by your response to senator shaheen's comments and senator rubio. we are sadly foreign commercial service woefully underrepresented and wherever opportunity to advocate for american business and american values and as you know i chaired to the hearings on this. we are about to come out with a report from the subcommittee and i would be interested as the first of my several questions and how you see has successfully competing with china which has a rapidly growing footprint across africa in both economic opportunities and in our differing values agenda and what that makes doing for and how you would address that as secretary e and senator coons were a terrific team with respect to africa and i
came. >> funding for this presentation -- hundreds came. >> to pakistan where police say more than 100 people have been killed in separate bombings in the country. the death toll has climbed and many more people have been injured. >> a bomb in the center that appears to have targeted soldiers. and then an attack at a religious gathering, 20 killed at this time. and in the evening, the bombing in an area where members share a muslim minority. journalists and onlookers have gathered at the site. and the building collapsed. scores of people, according to the police, have been killed. there are groups whose main aim is to target the shia muslims. hundreds have been killed. the authorities fail, and they find a way to end the bloodshed. >> reporting on a violent day in pakistan. barack obama announced he is nominating the white house chief of staff as america opposing new treasury secretary. saying he has his complete trust. he will replace timothy geithner that does not wish to serve a second term. the vice president continued his meetings on how to curb gun violence in america. he wants t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 549 (some duplicates have been removed)